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Case studies

AUSTRAC case studies are a valuable resource for industry and AUSTRAC's partner agencies. They reveal the diversity and seriousness of the organised crime and terrorism financing threats facing industry and the wider community.

These real-life cases present a snapshot of how criminals are seeking to misuse Australia's financial system and how AUSTRAC intelligence and analysis is instrumental in combating these criminals.

The case studies also demonstrate the enormous intelligence value of the financial transaction and suspicious matter reports AUSTRAC receives from industry as they play an important role as partners in combating serious and organised crime and the financing of terrorism.

Case studies from our international counterparts are available on the International case studies page.

Image of two dice being thrown across table
1 July 2012

AUSTRAC intelligence helps law enforcement investigation into a known criminal identity who was suspected of being involved in numerous large-scale drug importations into Australia.

Image of computer, poker chips and credit card
1 July 2012

An Albanian organised crime syndicate operating in Australia used an online betting service and an internet payment system to launder illicit proceeds from the sale of cannabis.

Image of casino table
1 July 2012

An Asian crime syndicate, which included an expert forgery artist, recruited foreign students to open bank accounts, steal mail and launder stolen cash.

Image of heroin and needle
1 July 2012

AUSTRAC information allowed law enforcement agencies to trace a Vietnamese heroin importation syndicates' financial activity, identify syndicate members and establish links between them and a wider network.

Image of cigarettes
1 July 2012

AUSTRAC information assisted authorities with an investigation into a company suspected of a multi-million dollar duty free fraud.

Image of money and explosions
1 July 2011

The following two related cases illustrate the challenge of identifying terrorism financing, given that it may model normal patterns of financial behaviour, be undertaken through low-value transactions, or not involve the financial sector at all.

Image of airport signage
1 July 2011

Australian casino staff lodged two suspicious matter reports with AUSTRAC detailing suspicious deposits of foreign currency into casino gambling accounts.

Image of faceless hooded man
1 July 2011

The discovery of a lost wallet at a fast food outlet led to a law enforcement operation that uncovered several cases of identity fraud.

Image of two dice being thrown across table
1 July 2010

AUSTRAC began monitoring the financial activities of a network of suspects after reporting entities submitted a series of reports about the network's financial activity.

Image of lines of cocaine
1 July 2010

AUSTRAC alerted a law enforcement agency to a series of suspicious transactions at a casino, sparking an investigation that led to the arrest of several members of a crime syndicate and the seizure of cash and a large, commercial quantity of drugs.

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